Category Archives: Medicaid

AHCA Recommends New Medicaid Payment System to Legislature

UPDATE: The Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) held their final public meeting on November 20, 2015, to wrap-up their discussion and submit recommendations to the Legislature for the development of an Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) to replace the current “cost-based per visit” rate methodology for Florida’s Medicaid program. AHCA’s recommendation will be to adopt a modified Enhanced Ambulatory Patient Grouping system (EAPG), which involves bundling procedures and medical visits that share similar characteristics and pays one base rate to the provider to cover all of the bundled services. The new system is expected to be implemented on July 1, 2016.

Tom Wallace, Bureau Chief of AHCA’s Medicaid Program Finance, along with members of Navigant Healthcare, the private consulting company contracted to develop the new payment system were looking at two primary model options for the OPPS: 1) the EAPG, which requires proprietary software (most likely from Navigant) that will need to be purchased by providers; and 2) the Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC) model, which is linked to Medicare’s OPPS system. By the last meeting in October, it was clear that AHCA and Navigant preferred the EAPG system to the APC model. The recommendation presented at the final meeting confirmed the agency’s preference for the EAPG model.

Significantly, the consulting company provided a simulation of how the EAPG system would pay claims to hospitals based on data collected by AHCA in accordance with the current payment system. Navigant provided charts of the top 20 hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) that would see the biggest payment increases and decreases. (See pages 23-26 of attached workshop presentation.) According to the simulation compiled by Navigant using previous years data, the greatest increases in payments will be seen by Ocala Regional Medical Center, Bethesda Hospital East, St. Vincent’s Medical Center and Bayfront Health – St. Petersburg. The greatest decreases will be seen by Jackson Memorial Hospital, Florida Hospital, Homestead Hospital and Sacred Heart Hospital. (Full simulation results are attached here and here as Exel spreadsheets.) Approximately 18 hospitals were excluded from the simulation (including University Behavioral Hospital, Windmoor Healthcare, Emerald Coast Behavioral, UF Health Shands, UF Health Jacksonville, and others) because approximately 33-percent or more of their prior claims data were missing procedure codes. (See page 18 of attached workshop presentation for complete list.) It was suggested at the meeting that the committee reach out to the hospitals to get their procedure codes so that they can be included in the simulation.

Additional recommendations that will be provided to the Legislature include the following:

  1. No outlier payments from Medicare OPPS (payments above or beyond scope of EAPG system);
  2. No service line adjusters and only one provider-specific adjuster for hospitals with high Medicaid outpatient utilization (Nemours Children’s Hospital, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital and All Children’s Hospital);
  3. No “charge cap” with the EAPG payment methodology to allow payment of the lessor of submitted charges or Medicaid-allowed amount;
  4. Allow a 5-percent adjustment to the EAPG base rate to account for anticipated documentation and coding improvement (consistent with the value used in the first year of APR-DRG implementation); and
  5. Applicable claims paid between July 1, 2016, and the date of implementation will be adjusted to apply EAPG pricing (retroactive to July 1, 2016).

AHCA will submit its recommendations to the Florida Legislature by November 30, 2015. Legislation regarding a new payment system is expected to be passed during the 2016 Session, with the new program to be effective on or about July 1, 2016.

For more information about AHCA’s development of the OPPS, please contact an attorney at Smith & Associates.

A Year in Review: AHCA’s Managed Medical Assistance Program

AHCA presented a Post-Award Forum for Florida’s 115 Managed Medical Assistance (MMA) Waiver during the Medical Care Advisory Committee meeting on October 13, 2015. The forum provided a platform for AHCA to showcase data of the MMA program’s success and hear comments from the public regarding specific areas where the program fell short.

Medicaid is a federal/state entitlement program which is jointly financed by state and federal funds. Federal law requires the coverage of certain eligibility groups and services (mandatory), and states have the option of covering additional eligibility groups and services (optional). Florida implemented the MMA program as a way to incentivize higher quality care without causing inflation. In February 2015, AHCA signed contracts with MMA insurance providers to deliver a system of care to residents in each of the 11 AHCA districts in Florida.

In analyzing Florida’s average annual cost for Medicaid care, AHCA representative Beth Kidder presented a graph showing that the cost per person dropped from $6,564 per person in year 2010-11 to an anticipated $5,878 in 2015-16. AHCA also showcased an increased rate of participation by physicians and dental care providers. From November 2013 to June 2015, AHCA noted an increase of 7.43-percent increase in MDs and DOs providing services to Medicaid recipients. During the same time period, AHCA stated that total participating dentists increased by 23.09-percent.

Most of the public comments regarding the MMA program focused on the failure to ensure payment by providers to Emergency Transport Services (EMS) in Florida. Several groups representing EMS providers throughout Florida complained about improperly denied reimbursement for medical transports and the categorical denial of transports of more than 30 miles. The EMS providers pointed out that Medicare reimbursed such transports, and so should the MMA program providers. One EMS provider suggested a rule or statutory revision to require hospitals and nursing homes to obtain pre-authorization for a transfer request so that EMS is ensured reimbursement.

The Agency will be releasing a series of quarterly reports on the Statewide Medicaid Managed Care program. Reports for the first two quarters are available on the Agency’s website. The Agency also began publishing a consumer-focused health plan report card which includes annual ratings on how Florida’s health plans are faring with regards to providing preventative health care services to women and children (i.e., well-child visits, prenatal care for pregnant women). Plan effectiveness is measured through the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS), which is a standardized set of performance measures by the National Committee for Quality Assurance and used by more than 90-percent of the health plans in the U.S.

For more information about the MMA program in Florida or any other issue, please contact an attorney at Smith & Associates.

Outpatient Prospective Payment Systems

The Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) hosted a public meeting on September 17, 2015, to discuss the development of an Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) to replace the current “cost-based per visit” rate methodology. The stated goal of this payment method conversion is to help control healthcare spending increases while continuing to maintain access to services for Florida’s Medicaid populations.

To assist with this development, AHCA contracted with private consulting company Navigant Healthcare which has offered options between two popular OPPS models that have been adopted by other states. Once a preliminary decision is made on a model, Navigant and AHCA will send its recommendations to the Legislature before the next session.

Currently, Navigant and AHCA are leaning towards adopting an Enhanced Ambulatory Patient Grouping System (EAPG), which involves bundling procedures and medical visits that share similar characteristics and pays one base rate to the provider to cover all of the bundled services. The rates, which have yet to be formulated, will be based on a review of average historical data measured from diagnosis codes and claims paid to outpatient providers from fiscal year 2013-14.

The other OPPS model being considered is the Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC) model. According to Navigant, the APC model provides less bundling for procedures and ancillary services (and, subsequently, more “a la carte” payments) than the EAPG model. The APC model excludes many services – including laboratory, pathology, physical therapy and DMEs – which must be paid under other fee schedules. EAPGs require proprietary grouper software (from Navigant?) and will be less familiar to providers compared to the APC model, which is linked to Medicare’s payment system.

Two more public meetings will be scheduled before AHCA submits recommendations for an OPPS to the Florida Legislature on November 30, 2015. Legislation regarding a new payment system is expected to be passed during the 2016 Session, and then implemented on July 1, 2016.

For more information about AHCA’s development of the OPPS, please contact an attorney at Smith & Associates.