Tag Archives: Employment Law

Coronavirus Impacts on Employers and Employees: Overview of Federal, State and Local Mitigation and Assistance Programs

The Coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented challenges for employers and employees as more stringent measures and restrictions are imposed almost daily by federal, state and local officials seeking to control the spread of the virus. The possibility of large geographic areas being ordered to “Shelter in Place” and not leave their homes is taking hold as cities and states continue to evaluate their options.

As of the date of this article, all public schools in Florida have been closed, most likely for the reminder of the school year; restaurants have been ordered to operate only at 50% of seating capacity; bars and nightclubs have been ordered to close for at least the next 30 days; Disney and Universal Studios, as well as other tourist attractions, have been closed until at least the end of the March, and likely beyond; the cruise industry has effectively shut down; and now the prospect of closing down Florida’s beaches seems to be on the horizon. Aside from the drastic government measures, the fear among the populace is palpable as many people now practicing social distancing by refusing to eat out at restaurants and limiting all but essential shopping and commercial activities. The impact on Florida’s business is already devastating on the state’s tourism and hospitality industries. As this crisis grows, business owners and employers are evaluating options and strategies to try to save their businesses. Employees are facing lay-offs with unemployment projected to reach the highest level since the Great Depression. Given the devastating consequences and economic dislocation, employers and employees alike should consider available assistance and mitigation programs available. A few possible options are:

The Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program: The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity will administer the Program in partnership with the Florida SBDC Network and Florida First Capital Finance Corporation to provide cash flow to businesses economically impacted by COVID-19. The short-term, interest-free loans help bridge the gap between the time the economic impact occurred and when a business secures other financial resources, including payment of insurance claims or longer-term Small Business Administration (SBA) loans. Up to $50 million has been allocated for the Program. The application period for this short-term interest-free loan opened on March 17, 2020 and will continue at least through May 8, 2020. The highlights of the program are:

  • Short-term interest-free loans in an amount up to $50,000 for business owners.
  • Loans to be repaid without interest within one year.
  • Interest rates after one year go to 12%.
  • Purpose of the Program is to provide short-term liquidity to small business owners to remain open despite economic impacts of the Coronavirus pandemic.

“Families First Coronavirus Response Act” (H.R. 6201): This emergency federal legislation passed the House overwhelmingly with bipartisan support and is expected to pass the Senate today. The key features place new responsibilities on employers to assist employees who are affected when the employee or a family member is affected by Coronavirus. The Bill includes the following:

  • Applies to businesses with fewer than 500 employees.
  • Paid Family and Medical Leave for 12 weeks (the first 14 days are to be paid under sick leave provisions).
  • This leave benefit covers employees who have been working for at least 30 calendar days.
  • Among other uses, employees may use the leave to respond to quarantine requirements or recommendations, to care for family members who are responding to quarantine requirements or recommendations, and to care for a child whose school has been closed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • After the first 14 days, employers must compensate employees in an amount that is not less than two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay. These pay requirements apply to only the COVID-19-related leave reasons listed above.
  • The provisions will go into effect 15 days after the date of enactment and expire on December 31, 2020.
  • Paid Sick Leave provisions of the Bill also require employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide full-time employees two weeks (80 hours) of paid sick leave for specific circumstances related to COVID-19 (e.g., self-isolating, doctors’ visits, etc.).
    Part-time employees are also covered and entitled to paid sick leave for the number of hours equal to the number of hours they work, on average, over a two-week period.
  • Employers must compensate employees for any paid sick time they take at their regular rates of pay.
  • Employers will be required to post a notice informing employees of their rights to leave.
  • As currently drafted, the Bill expressly provides that it does not preempt existing state or local paid sick leave entitlements.
  • Employers will be provided with tax credits to offset their costs in meeting the new paid leave mandates.
  • The provisions will go into effect 15 days after the date of enactment and expire on December 31, 2020.
  • The Bill provides $1 billion in emergency unemployment insurance (UI) relief to the states: $500 million for costs associated with increased administration of each state’s UI program and $500 million held in reserve to assist states with a 10 percent increase in unemployment. Besides demonstrating an increase in unemployment, in order to receive a portion of this grant money, states must temporarily relax certain UI eligibility requirements, such as waiting periods and work search requirements.

Additional Federal Legislation Under Consideration: Additional legislation will be adopted to provide relief to employees who are dislocated by the impacts of the pandemic. As of this writing, the proposal is likely to include a cash payment directly to every American worker in an amount of $1,000.00. The overall price tag of this Bill is projected to be in excess of $1 Trillion. Details of the program will be posted in subsequent updates to this article.

Conclusion:

There is absolutely no question that Coronavirus will pose new challenges for both Employers and Employees. In assessing their business strategy for meeting new obligations, and navigating the process to seek assistance, both employers and employees should consider consulting with qualified legal counsel. If you have questions about any of the issues contained herein, you should contact an attorney at Smith & Associates to discuss your rights.

Employer Liability Under the FLSA

If your company has received a demand letter or a complaint alleging Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) violations, it needs to act quickly to protect itself and its rights.

  • Institute a Litigation Hold: Once your business becomes aware that there is or may be a lawsuit against it, it has a duty to protect the relevant records. Failure to do so may lead to sanctions from the Court which could include the entry of a default judgment for the employee.
  • Compile Timekeeping Records: It will come down to you, the employer, to ultimately produce records to show that there was no FLSA violation. Getting these records in order soon can cut down on litigation time and costs.
  • Don’t Retaliate: If the person bringing the claim is still employed with you, do not fire, demote, or otherwise retaliate against him or her. This can result in additional claims and damages.
  • Timely Respond: Ensure that you timely respond to all due dates. Failure to timely respond to the complaint can lead to a default judgment in favor of the employee.

    • Hire an Experienced Attorney
      If the employee prevails in the lawsuit, the FLSA provides that the employer must pay for the employee’s attorney fees. So, if you are thinking of saving money by not hiring an attorney, you may end up paying for one anyway—the employee’s. FLSA litigation can be complex, involving not just the statute, but rules from the Department of Labor and case law. Navigating through FLSA litigation requires an attorney who understands these details and will vigorously defend your business against these claims. At Smith & Associates, we understand employment litigation and are committed to providing you with the quality representation you deserve.

      At Smith & Associates, we provide all aspects of Employment Related Legal Representation to Employers including:Compliance Review, Litigation, Appeals, Employment Contracts,Handbook and Policy Drafting, and Unemployment Appeals. If you need held with employment related law issues, contact us for a free consultation.